Tuesday, June 16, 2009

Oliver Walker History

Grant Lee, Roland Lee, and Andrea Lee Conley on the Oliver Walker property in Caldwell County Missouri
Descendants Grant Lee, Roland Lee, and Andrea Lee Conley visited the Oliver Walker property in Caldwell County Missouri on Memorial Day 2009.

Oliver Walker was born in New York, New York 11 July 1782 to William and Leah Walker. In 1803 he married Nancy Cressy, daughter of William Cressy and Hannah Townsend, born in New Brunswick, New Jersey 20 January 1780. They had ten children, 37 grandchildren, and at least 124 great grandchildren.

Their first three children John R, Hannah, and William Cressy were born in New York City 1804, 1805, and 1807. The family is next in Essex, Essex County, New York, where Mary Ann, Alfred, Sarah, and Julian were born in 1808, 1810, 1812, and 1814. Then they moved to Dayton, Montgomery County, Ohio where Dionitia and Nancy Reeder Walker were born in 1816 and 1817.

Oliver purchased land in Winchester, Randolph County, Indiana 27 March 1819 in Section 22 SW 1/4 and Section 28 N 1/2, then Section 21 SE 1/4 and Section 22 SW 1/4 in May 1819.

1820 Census Greensfork Township, Randolph County, Indiana Oliver Walker 011311-2112.

1823 May 16 daughter Eveline born in Winchester, Randolph County, Indiana.

1824 February 27 daughter Mary Ann Walker married Mahlon Johnson in Winchester, Randolph County, Indiana.

1825 March 1 Son John Walker married Susannah Ennis in Winchester, Randolph County, Indiana.

1830 Census White River Township, Randolph County, Indiana Oliver Walker 00002010-001200001.

1831-Oliver is baptized by Zebedee Coltrin (Jun-Sept) Missionary journals of Levi Hancock and Zebedee Coltrin. The companions were in Winchester, Randolph County, Indiana during July and august 1831 and there they "raised a large branch of the Church....We then went to Winchester and stopped at the county seat on the head waters of the White River. We saw there a schoolmaster and introduced the Gospel to him. He was so well pleased with the message that he spread the news as fast as possible and called a meeting. After the meeting he wanted to be baptised, so we went to the water with him and baptised him. soon after this we were happy to hear that nearly all the people wanted to hear us so we went to the court house and got permission to hold a meeting there. After this meeting we were able to baptise several others."

1831 December 1 Oliver Walker listed in Far West Records from a meeting in Winchester, Randolph, Indiana.

1832 February 16, son William Cressy Walker married Rachael Wright in Randolph County, Indiana.

1834 September 14 Marriage of daughter Nancy Reeder Walker to Horace Martin Alexander by Oliver Walker, Justice of the Peace in Randolph County, Indiana.

1834 December Meeting in Kirtland at the School House in high council, Oliver Walker pronounced faithful.

southwest corner of Oliver Walker property in Missouri1836 August 16 Oliver Walker from Randolph County, Indiana purchased land in Section 12 along Shoal Creek, Caldwell County, Missouri.

Oliver Walker homesite in section 1 Caldwell County Missouri1836 December Oliver Walker purchased land in Section 1 along Shoal Creek, Caldwell County, Missouri where he makes his home.

Oliver Walker Property in Missouri

Shoal Creek runs through the Oliver Walker property1838 September 4 both daughters Eveline Walker and Dionitia Walker married by Brigham Young at Oliver’s home on Shoal Creek, Caldwell County, Missouri.

Southeast corner of Oliver Walker property as it looks in 20091838 September 29 Oliver Walker gives Kirtland camp pumpkins and shelled beans-owns 100 acres of land 3 miles east of Haun’s Mill on Shoal Creek, Caldwell County, Missouri.

1838 October Oliver tries to negotiate peace before Haun’s Mill Massacre.

1838 October 30 Haun’s Mill Massacre, son John Walker and son-in-law Mahlon Johnson survive.

1840 October 10, charges against Oliver Walker by David Fullmer, put off until April.

1840 Green County, Illinois Oliver Walker as justice of the peace marries a couple. He owns property on Block 65, Nauvoo, Hancock County, Illinois.

1842 Oliver Walker Nauvoo City Tax List.

Oliver Walker is buried in the old Nauvoo Burial Grounds, Nauvoo Illinois1843 April 17 Oliver Walker dies of cholera (inflammation of the lungs age 60 yrs, 2 mo, 2 days, Nauvoo Sexton records) in Nauvoo, Hancock County, Illinois and is buried and remembered in the Old Nauvoo Burying ground.

1843 June 14, wife Nancy’s Administrator’s notice for claims against estate to be paid by August 1, 1843, Probate court Hancock County.

Oliver Walker name on memorial at Nauvoo burial grounds1846 February 6 Nancy Walker takes out her endowments in the Nauvoo Temple, the work is done vicariously for her husband Oliver, she is sealed for eternity to him, and for time to Brigham Young.

Nancy R Walker monument at Winter Quarters
1847 Daughter Nancy Reeder Walker Alexander dies at Winter Quarters, leaves three children.

1848 Nancy Walker crosses plains in Brigham Young’s Company, Amasa Lyman Section, James H Rollins Fifty, leaving Winter Quarters last of June with daughter Eveline Walker Rollins’ family and son-in-law James Henry Rollins’ mother Keziah Rollins Burk, and Horace Alexander’s three children, arriving in October 1848.

1850 Census Utah, Utah Territory Dionysia with Amasa Lyman family. Where is Nancy?

1851 Nancy Walker goes with daughter Eveline and son-in-law James Henry Rollins to settle San Bernadino, California. During an earthquake there, Nancy was “carried from the house for it appeared the walls would shake down. We were all very frightened. Great faults opened in the valley.” By grand daughter Melissa Keziah Rollins.

1857/8 Nancy Walker returned from San Bernadino to Utah with Rollins family, “refused to ride in wagon at a steep hill. But as she began walking, “the fat little lady stumbled and rolled right down to the bottom of the hill. We were alarmed for her safety, but grandma got up laughing, and suffered no injury.” By grand daughter Melissa Keziah Rollins.

1860 Census Parowan, Iron, Utah Territory Dencia Lyman 45 Seamstress, Nancy Walker 80.

1868 December 30 Nancy Walker made wedding dress for grand daughter Melissa Keziah Rollins and attended her wedding. (age 89)

1870 Census Minersville, Beaver, Utah Territory Dionisia Lyman 54 Midwife, Nancy Walker 90.

1870 December 17 Nancy Walker died and was buried in Minersville, Utah at age 91, twenty-seven years after husband’s death in Nauvoo.

Son John R Walker born 13 May 1804 in New York City, New York, married 1 March 1825 to Susannah Ennis in Randolph County, Indiana. It appears Susannah dies before 1850 and that John dies after 1850.

Children: Carolyn M Walker born 21 December 1825 Randolph County, Indiana, married Samuel Keele 25 January 1844 Nauvoo, Illinois by Hyrum Smith. Received her patriarchal blessing from John Smith 25 October 184?. Don't know what happens to her as Samuel marries Annie Elizabeth Hess at Mt. Pisgah, Iowa and together they continue on to Utah, then Panaca, Nevada. Ellen C Walker born 1829, married David W Thomas about 1844, died 1867-70, and had ten children: Emily J Thomas 1846, Sarah L Thomas 1848, George W Thomas 1850, William A Thomas 1853, Charles P Thomas 1855, Henry W Thomas 1857, David E Thomas 1859, Lirac Thomas 1862, Wesley Thomas 1865, and Helen Thomas 1867. Levi H Walker born 1832 in Indiana, married Mary born October 1835, died before 1900 possibly in Salinas, San Luis Obispo, California, and had four children: George T Walker October 1858, William F Walker 1863, Susan Eva Walker 1867, and Horace A Walker January 1874. Mary A Walker born 1834 in Missouri, Thaddeus Walker born 1838 in Missouri found on 1881 Canada Census Toronto, Peel, Ontario age 42 minister, with wife Mary S 37 from England and five children Emma F Lee 9, Mary G Lee 7, Frank W Lee 5, Henry P Lee 3, Herbert O Lee 0, Annie C Brown 30 from England. James H Walker born 1841 in Illinois , married Susa C about 1868 and had one son Francis G Walker born 1870, lived in East Cape Girardeau, Alexander, Illinois in 1880.

1830 Census
Randolph County, Indiana John Walker 30001-10001, next door to James Ennis, his wife’s brother. 1831 baptized by Zebedee Coltrin, Randolph County, Indiana. 30 October 1838-Survivor of Haun’s Mill, Caldwell County, Missouri. “Inside the shop John Walker was hit with a ball in his right arm. Unable to reload he and another defender took out for the field. They ran down the bank of the creek. On the way up on the other side, his companion was hit. Walker hid under some lumber standing along side the creek bank.” nortonfamily.net (The Indiana Saints at the Haun’s Mill Massacre)

13 Jan 1840 Redress Petitions Alton, Madison County, Illinois:
“I the undersigned do by these presents represent To You my losses and Sufferings in the State of Missouri in the Year 1838. &c by the Hands of a mob who pillaged and destroyed my Goods &C in Jackson and Caldwell Countys and Which Losses I Certify To be no Less than Five Hundred Dollars further that I suffered many injuries from this mob By Breaking in my windows By Thrusting Long Poles Through at My family and Driving them from their Habitation.” signed John R. Walker Pg. 550

James Rollins Autobiography, BYU, p.10 - p.11 "While riding on my journey that day, I met a boy at Wood River Bridge, one mile from Alton, I quickly inquired of him, if my wife was in Alton. He said, "Yes, she is very bad at her brother's John Walker's. If you want to see her alive, hurry." The same words that was said to me when I lay asleep on the log. I surely did hurry my jaded horse and landed on the doorstep of John Walker's house. There I found my warning true in every sense as the doctor and women were just putting my wife in bed as I arrived. She was expected to die for days. Previous to this in a few days after my return she began to recover, when she was well enough, I rented a house and my family and Wm. Walker's family moved together into the house which I had rented. Soon after this, Adam Lightner, my brother-in-law and wife returned from Louisville, Kentucky and then they lived in the same house, also, it being a very large house. We all remained there during the summer season. I then moved to Clifftony miles above Alton where we found a house empty, large enough for 3 or 4 families to live in. We here decided to build a large flat boat for carrying wood to Alton and St. Lewis, this boat we constructed during the winter. Previous to this we hired a smaller boat and loaded it with sugar, maple for the Alton mill. As we arrived with the boat near the mill we endeavored to land the boat and fasten it to the shore, the boat in turning dipped water. I took the rope and swam to the shore, fastened it. In coming around she filled with water and sunk. The wood above the gunels of the boat was taken off by the current and floated down the river. We succeeded in raising the boat and emptied it of its contents that remained and we took the boat and tied it that night to the place where we had loaded it in the morning. "

1840 Census Upper Alton, Madison County, Illinois John R Walker 112001-011001. 28th Quorum Seventies 1845 Nauvoo. Endowed 6 Feb 1846 Nauvoo temple (no wife mentioned). 1850 Census Irish Hollow Precinct, Jo Daviess County, Illinois David W Thomas 29, Ellen Thomas 21, Emily J Thomas 5, Sarah L Thomas 2, George W Thomas 11/12, John Walker 45 farmer, (no wife mentioned), Levi Walker 18, Mary A Walker 16, Thaddeus Walker 13, James H Walker 9.

Son William Cressy Walker born 26 June 1807 in New York City, New York, marriage 16 Feb 1832 Randolph County, Indiana to Rachael Wright. William dies after 1880, Rachael between 1870-1880. 1830 Census White River, Randolph County, Indiana. About 1831 Elder Levi Hancock recorded the events of a Winchester missionary meeting in his journal: “The next morning Sunday came and we were prepared for the worst. It was my turn to speak and I sang too. Zebedee gave the prayer. Bill Walker placed himself at the door and looked as surly as a bull; he was my friend. He said nothing, but something said to me, that I should not be hurt. So I commenced talking and soon forgot myself and said what came to my heart. I mounted the bench and walked in among the same crows who had written that letter. I said, ‘You wrote to warn me to leave this place before then, but you see I am still here. … My father fought for liberty you now enjoy, and you want to deprive me of the liberty that rightly belongs to me. … I am a cousin to the first man who signed the Declaration of Independence. Now, if you want to reveal anything to me, come on, I am ready."

James Rollins Autobiography, BYU, p.10 - p.11 About 10 o'clock in the day I succeeded in obtaining bail. My bail was fixed for all these crimes and I was signed by the notorious Beaugard Methodist preacher, Nathaniel Carr, my brother-in-law. Soon after this was settled, I obtained a horse, saddle, and bridle, and started with my wife on the same horse for Far West, 36 miles distance. It was quite cold, and we had to ride and run alternately to get warm until we arrived, wearied at Far West in the night safely. We had not been home long, Beaugard appeared in Far West and exacted my step-father's hotel, my father-in-law's hundred acres of land, and 40 acres of my own land, at least a thousand dollars worth of other property for security for the five hundred dollars for my bail, or he would take me back to prison. Some of the land that he wanted lay 3 miles from Haun's Mill. I had not heard whether my wife's father would consent to Beaurgard's requirements or not. About this time, my wife's brother, William Walker, brought a horse, saddle, and bridle and portmanteau, and told me to take the horse and skip. Beaugard, that evening, took me up stairs and told me if I didn't produce those men to go my security the next day, he would take me back to prison. That night I saddled up the horse and mother gave me $16 to start with. C. L. Higbee and myself started together. The young people of Far West had gathered at a house half a mile out of town to bid us good-bye."

James Rollins Autobiography, BYU, p.10 - p.11 "While riding on my journey that day, I met a boy at Wood River Bridge, one mile from Alton, I quickly inquired of him, if my wife was in Alton. He said, "Yes, she is very bad at her brother's John Walker's. If you want to see her alive, hurry." The same words that was said to me when I lay asleep on the log. I surely did hurry my jaded horse and landed on the doorstep of John Walker's house. There I found my warning true in every sense as the doctor and women were just putting my wife in bed as I arrived. She was expected to die for days. Previous to this in a few days after my return she began to recover, when she was well enough, I rented a house and my family and Wm. Walker's family moved together into the house which I had rented. Soon after this, Adam Lightner, my brother-in-law and wife returned from Louisville, Kentucky and then they lived in the same house, also, it being a very large house. We all remained there during the summer season. I then moved to Clifftony miles above Alton where we found a house empty, large enough for 3 or 4 families to live in. We here decided to build a large flat boat for carrying wood to Alton and St. Lewis, this boat we constructed during the winter. Previous to this we hired a smaller boat and loaded it with sugar, maple for the Alton mill. As we arrived with the boat near the mill we endeavored to land the boat and fasten it to the shore, the boat in turning dipped water. I took the rope and swam to the shore, fastened it. In coming around she filled with water and sunk. The wood above the gunels of the boat was taken off by the current and floated down the river. We succeeded in raising the boat and emptied it of its contents that remained and we took the boat and tied it that night to the place where we had loaded it in the morning."

Mormon Redress Petitions 13 January 1840 Alton, Madison, Illinois, p 550: "I the undersigned do by these presents represent To You my Losses and Suffering in the State of Missouri in the Year 1838 By the Hands of a mob in that State who pillaged my Goods & Chattels and drove me and my family from my home. And do Certify my Loss of property To be no Less than Six Hundred Dollars." signed Wm C. Walker.

1840 Census Bond County, Illinois, (next to Madison County, Illinois, and 2 families away from sister Nancy and husband Horace Martin Alexander) Wm C Walker 30001-20001 , also 1840 Census Upper Alton, Madison County, Illinois.

1842 August 12 -William Walker rides Joseph Smith's horse Joe Duncan across the Mississippi River to give the impression that Joseph Smith had crossed over to the Iowa side.

1842 December 5- Arrest warrant signed in Nauvoo, Illinois by Joseph Smith for the arrest of Amos Davis accused of assault and battery on William C. Walker, also for slander, and selling spirits by the small quantity.

1850 Census. 1860 Census Dallas City, Henderson County, Illinois Wm C Walker Dealer in wood 53, Rachel 47, John B 24, William C 22, Perry C 19, Thomas O 17, Hiram W 13, Rachel E 12, Clarrissa 19, Charles 1. 1870 Census Dallas City, Henderson, Illinois William Walker 64 Day Labr, Rachel 57, John 31, William 27, Charles 25, Hiram 23, Evaline 21, Wilson 11, Lizzie 7, and next door James Walker 29, Adda 20, John 4, and Francis 6/12 born Dec. 1880 Census Dallas City, Henderson County, Illinois William C Walker 73 farmer, JB 44 son, P Charles 42 son, Oliver T 38 son, H W 34 son, William W 21 Gson, Margrett E 17 gdau, Henry W Bodey 30 SonL, R E bodey 30 dau, Henry W Bodey 4 Gson, Rachel C Bodey 2 Gdau.


Children:
John R Walker born 1836 Indiana, died after 1880, married Clarrissa E Brewer 5 July1858 in Hancock County, Illinois, and had at least 2 children: William Wilson Walker born April 1859 in Illinois who married Susan E about 1888, found on the 1900 Census in San Miquel Township, San Louis Obismo County, California, and Margaret Elizabeth or Lizzy Walker born November 1862 and married John C Newton about 1884.

William C Walker
born 1838 in Missouri and dies 13 January 1919 in Stronghurst, Henderson Illinois, marries Rebecca Jane Sparks 15 February 1876 in Hancock County, Illinois. She is born July 1852 Illinois to Robert Thomas Sparks and Mary Ann Wallingford, and dies after 1920. 1880 Census Carman, Henderson, Illinois William C 39 Druggist, Rebecca J 26, Mary 3, Eva 1. 1900 Census Stronghurst, Henderson, Illinois William C 55 Druggist 6/9 chrn alive, Rebecca J 47, Mary 23, Evalina 21, Clara 19, Charles 17, Ben H 16, Logan 13. 1910 Census Farmington Ward 3, Fulton, Illinois William C/8 chrn alive 73 married 34 yrs 6, Jane R 59,Evalina Burdon 31 md 6 yrs, Madge Burdon 5, Mildred Burdon 3. 1920 Census Dallas, Hancock, Illinois Rebecca Walker 68 widow, Eva Burdon 40 Divorces telephone operator, Milddred Burdon 12, Madge Burdon 15. They have eight or nine children, six known: Mary Walker born February 1877 in Henderson County, Illinois; Evalina Walker born March 1879 in Henderson County, Illinois and marries about 1904 to Mr. Burdon, divorces before 1910 Census with parents, 1920 Census with mother, 1930 Census Chicago, Cook, Illinois Eva Burdon 51 Widow, Mildred Johnson 23 widow telephone operator; Clara Walker born October 1881 in Henderson County, Illinois; Charles Peck Walker born 16 March 1883 in Carman, Henderson, Illinois, and dies April 1964 in Illinois SS Death, 1910 Census Sitka, Alaska US Marine Corp Barracks, and WW2 Registration, Benjiman Harrison Walker born 7 September 1884 in Carman, Henderson, Illinois, and dies after 1942 WW 2 Registration; and John Logan Walker born 14 February 1887 in Carman, Henderson, Illinois, and dies after 1942. He has WW1 and WW 2 registration and mentions wife and five children in 1917.

Perry Charles Walker
born 1841 in Illinois and dies after 1880.

Thomas Oliver Walker
born about 1843 in Illinois and dies after 1880.

Hiram W Walker born 1847 in Dallas City, Hancock County, Illinois, married Susan J Busard 11 November 1892 in Knox County, Illinois, and died probably in Chico, Butte, California. Susan was born to Hugh Wesley Busard and Mary Jane Wilson in Ft Madison, Lee, Iowa and had at least one child: Margret born 1899 in Washington. Susan remarried to Helcy G Nichols in California and died 9 February 1942 probably back in Madison, Lee, Iowa. 1900 Census. 1910 Census Chico, Butte, California Hiram W Walker 64, fruit farm, Susan J 41, Margret J 11. 1920 Census Chico, Butte, California Halcy G Nichols 54, Susan 50. 1930 Census Madison, Lee, Iowa Susan J Nichols 60 widow.

Rachael Eveline Walker
born January 1849 in Illinois and died after 1900 Census age 51 widow 3/3 chrn alivewhere she is living in Exira Township, Anderson County, Illinois. She married Henry W Bodey 15 June 1875 in Hancock County, Illinois and had Henry W Bodey born 1876 in Illinois, Rachel C Bodey born 1878 in Illinois, and Ron E Bodey born September 1882 in Illinois. Henry died 1880/ 1900.

Daughter Mary Ann Walker born 13 Dec 1808 in Essex, Essex, New York, and marries Mahlon Johnson 27th February 1824 in Winchester, Randolph, Indiana. Her husband was a survivor of Haun’s Mill. Mahlon and Mary Ann Johnson take out Endowments 6 February 1846 in the Nauvoo Temple, Illinois. Mahlon died about 1858 at Galena, Jo Daviess County, Illinois. Mary Ann died died after 1870.

They had 11 children:
William W Johnson
born 29 December 1825 in Randolph County, Indiana and married 14 May 1846 to Mary McCall born in Scotland, found 1880 census in Lincoln, Clark, Missouri with five children born in Missouri: Mary 1862, Reuben 1864, Nettie 1866, William 1868, and Henry N 1871,

Angeline Johnson
born 1 June 1827 in Randolph County, Indiana.

Nancy Johnson
born 13 June 1829 in Randolph County, Indiana and died 5 November 1848.

Elijah Johnson born 28 July 1830 Randolph County, Indiana,

Mary Jane Johnson born 8 January 1831 in Randolph County, Indiana and died after 1871-found 1n 1850, 60 70 census.

Sarah Ann Johnson born 13 December 1836 in Missouri and dies before 1850.

Jacob Henry Johnson born 7 August 1839 in Missouri, marries Mary C who is born August 1854 in Ohio and dies after 1910, and has William H Johnson born December 1874 in Iowa, Jacob A Johnson born July 1876 in Iowa, Francis L Johnson born 1881 in Missouri, and Nellie May Johnson born April 1884 in Iowa. The family is found on 1850, 60,70, 80 census. 1900 and 1910 Census Jackson Township, Lee, Iowa. Jacob dies 1900/1910.

Mahlon Johnson
born 20 October 1841 in Illinois and found on 1850 and 60 census.

Joseph Johnson born 31 August 1846 in Illinois and dies before 1850.

John E Johnson born 10 October 1848 in Illinois, found on 1850, 60, 70 census, and died 1870.

Dionitia
Johnson born 1850 in Illinois.

"President Young was frequently in the post office during the day attending to a variety of business. Received a plate of honey, which came from a tree found by Mahlon Johnson. At 7 the wind changed to the north. At 8, President Young came into the post office and heard the camp journal read from Thursday morning last and pronounced it good, and retired to his wagon where he lodged at 9 o'clock. About 4 pm afternoon the ground was whitened with hail the size of peas."

Mormon Redress Petitions 9 May 1839 Adams County, Illinois, and 13 January 1840 Madison County, Illinois. “I the undersigned do by these present Represent You My Losses and Suffering in the State of Missouri in the Year 1838 by the hands of a mob who pillaged and destroyed my Goods, and Chattels, and drove me and my family from Lands Which I had Entered in that State. And previous To this was driven from Jackson Co my Crop Taken my house Burned &c. 1833. Also was shot at in my Own house by the Mob and was forsed into Clay county and then from Clay into Caldwell Co. and from thence To Illinois. This may certify that—I was at Hauns Mill and one of those who was attacked By A Company of Two Hundred and Sixty Men under the Command of Arthur Cumstock, who fell upon us who were 36 in No. and killed and wounded 31 of the Company 23 of which are Dead, Then plundered Houses and Drove away Horses Waggons &c Loaded with Goods And this may Certify that the Losses which I sustained To be no Less than Two Thousand Dollars” Mahlon Johnson.

1830 Census White River, Randolph County, Indiana Mahlon Johnson 10002-10001. 1840 Census Upper Alton, Madison County, Illinois Mahlon Johnson 101001-012001. 1850 Census Jo Davies County, Illinois Mary Ann Johnson 41, Mary J 20, Henry J 11, Mahlon 8, John E 6. 1860 Census Keokuk, Lee County, Iowa Mary Ann Johnson 50 Occupation-Boarding House, Mary Jane 30, Henry 20, John E 16, Malin 17. 1870 Census Keokuk, Lee County, Iowa Census Mary Ann Johnson 61, Mary J 38, Henry 30, John 26.



Daughter Dionitia Walker born 10 March 1816 in Dayton, Montgomery County, Ohio. Married 1st Jeremiah Plumb by Brigham Young at her father’s place on Shoal Creek, Caldwell County, Missouri same day as her sister Eveline married James Henry Rollins, had child Hyrum R. Plumb who died age 5 years, 7 months, 23 days in Nauvoo, Illinois of measles and is buried Old Nauvoo Burying Grounds.

Redress petition 1838 and 13 January 1840 pp 519, 520- “To the Honorable Senate and House of Representatives in Congress Assembled at the City of Washington in the district of Columbia—I the undersigned do By these present represent To Your Honorable Body My Losses Troubles and sufferings which I sustained and underwent By the Hands of a Ruthless Mob in the State of Missouri in the Year of our Lord 1838. By forcibly being driven from my Land and Home in that State. And this is To Petition Your Honorable Body That I may Have Redress of these my Grievances which I Have Sustained By the hand of Law Breakers in Taking from me my Rights which the Constitution of this Republic Guarantees unto all free BornCitizens--Further with Respect to the Conduct of this mob. I have had my Life Threatened And received many Abuses Too numerous To mention And the Loss of Property &c. To be no Less Than 1,000 dollars which I sustained, also my Life was Threatened By William Tailor and a pistal held at my Breast By him. And was obliged to make heavy Exertions To Extricate myself from him This in short is a history of my Grievances and Humbly ask You To Take into Consideration These suffering And by so doing Your Servant will Ever Pray.” --Jeremiah Plumb

“P.S. I the Undersigned Certify in addition That we the people Called Mormons, (after a Conference was held by the principal Men of the Mo. Militia) was forced by the point of the sword To Sign a deed of Trust Signing Away Our Lands; The principal Men Engaged in this Business was Thomas Birch Acting States Attorney for that District also Genl. Clark Commander in General of the Militia also Genl. Saml. D. Lucas of Independence Jackison Co Mo.”

1840 Census Nauvoo, Hancock county, Illinois Jeremiah Plumb 0000101-000010001. Madison County, Illinois 1842 Tax record with Jeremiah in Hancock County, Illinois $10 cattle, $10 clocks, $40 other property. 1842 Nauvoo Census Jeremiah Plum, Dionitia Plum, Hirum R Plum 3rd Ward. Dionitia divorced Jeremiah who is found in the penetentiary in Upper Alton 1850 Census for horse thievery (whether or not this is true I do not know). Dinicia Plumb is shown in UPR ALTON record of members 1841-1845 with Horace M and Nancy Alexander. Dionitia in July 1845 marries Amasa Lyman in Nauvoo, Illinois. Endowments with him and her mother in Nauvoo Temple 30 December 1845.

Tended sick sister Nancy Alexander, with whom she, “took refuge in a vacant house, where they prepared a cup of coffee and food for themselves and Isaac Morley and a companion who had escaped from the mob and had been hiding in a corn field for days and were sick from living on green corn alone. Mrs. Lyman discovered six or eight of the mob approaching and warned the brethren to flee and hide, but they declined to go saying they can only kill us. They had not strength to go any further. While watching at the door the mobbers ordered her away or would shoot. She upbraided them for pursuing sick women and tagging them after driving them from their homes. She challenged them to shoot as she had but once to die. The mobber shot overhead to frighten her out of the door, but she kept her post and the mob were ashamed and withdrew. The next day Mrs. Lyman found it necessary to move to another vacant house for the comfort of her sick sister, where she could be more quiet. An intruder came and abruptly peered into the window, pushing the shawl aside that covered the opening. The second time he did that Mrs. Lyman dashed a cup of boiling hot water full in his face and he went jumping and howling away. His companions told him it served him just right.” Daughters of the Utah Pioneers and Their Mothers, p 103 Jas. T. Jakeman.

Her sister Nancy and new baby died at Winter Quarters in 1847. Dionitia came to Utah in 1848 with husband Amasa Lyman, mother Nancy Walker, sister Eveline Rollins and family, and sister Nancy's other three children. 1850 Census Utah, Utah Territory Dionysia with Amasa Lyman family. Where is Nancy? 1860 Census Parowan, Iron, Utah Territory Dencia Lyman 45 Seamstress, Nancy Walker 80. 1870 Census Minersville, Beaver, Utah Territory Dionisia Lyman 54 Midwife, Nancy Walker 90. She is listed as Dionitia Walker 64, widow (her husband Amasa Lyman having died in Fillmore in 1877) on the 1880 Census Panaca, Lincoln, Nevada living with (her sister Eveline’s daughter and husband) Melissa K Lee 28, and John Nelson Lee 38, Jane E 10, Ada M 8, Mary E 6, John R 5, James H 2, Ida D 9M. Had herself and son Hyrum sealed to prophet Joseph Smith with Brigham Young acting as proxy 27 October 1886. Dionitia dies 11 July 1894 and is buried in Minersville, Utah.

Daughter Nancy Reeder Walker born 8 Dec 1817 Dayton, Montgomery County, Ohio, married Horace Martin Alexander 14 September 1834 in Winchester, Randolph County, Indiana by her dad. 1840 Census Bond County, Illinois, (next to Madison County, Illinois, and 2 families away from brother William C Walker and wife Rachel Wright) H M Alexander and Nancy with one daughter who dies 00001-10001. Nancy died 28 January 1847 at Winter Quarters shortly after the birth of Horace Martin Alexander Junior who was born 1 January 1847 and died 31 January 1847, three days after Nancy.

She had four daughters, Nancy Maria Alexander born 24 March 1839 in Alton, Madison, Illinois who died early, Frances Evaline Alexander born 1 September 1836 in Liberty, Clay County, Missouri, and died 13 November 1906, marrying Jessie Pierce Steel 4 October 1853 in Salt Lake City, Utah. They had eleven children: Horace Alexander Steele born 9 September 1854, Jesse Fielding Steele born 2 October 1856, Louisa Dionicia Steele born 8 November 1858, Nancy Evaline Steele born 25 September 1861, Sarah Catherine Steele born 2 February 1864, Daniel Wells Steele born 5 July 1866, Adam Leonidas Steele born 7 February 1869, Mary Jane Steele born 1 March 1871, Joseph William Steele born 6 July 1866, John Pierce Steele born 13 september 1876, and Cora Jensine Stelle born 11 February 1879. Sarah Malinda Alexander born 5 March 1841 at Alton, Madison County, Illinois and died 16 November 1908 in Mona, Juab, Utah, marrying John Green 27 May 1856 in the Endowment House in Salt Lake City. They had eleven children: John Martin Green born 25 November 1858, Eveline Dinitia Green born 12 May 1860, Clarissa Louise Green born 6 August 1861, Mary Melissa Green born 2 april 1863, Amasa Lyman Green born 6 September 1865, Horace Alexander Green born 7 May 1866, Sarah Helen Green born 23 August 1869, Nancy Lewella Green born 7 November 1871, William Hanson Green born 25 January 1873, Franklin green born 29 September 1875, and James Samuel Green born 3 November 1879. Dionetta Emily Alexander born 18 October 1843 in Nauvoo, Hancock, Illinois, and died 24 October 24 1879 in Parowan, Iron, Utah, marrying Hans Jorgen Pedersen Mortensen 16 May 1859 in Parowan, Iron, Utah. They had eleven children: Hans Lyman Mortensen born 16 February 1860, Nancy Dionitia Mortensen born and died 16 August 1861, William Henry Mortensen born 16 September 1862, Francis Marion Mortensen born 19 December 1863, Lena Losana Mortensen born 25 February 1866, Sarah Eveline Mortensen born 8 December 1867, Horace Martin Mortensen born 21 March 1870, Jesse Leonidas Mortensen born 21 April 1873, William Wallace Mortensen born 23 April 1875, Junius Denton Mortensen born 12 August 1877, and James Peter Mortensen born 24 October 1879.

As orphaned children, the three little girls went on to Utah with Nancy's mother Nancy Walker and sister Eveline Walker Rollins and husband James Henry Rollins. Horace remarried after his return from Mormon Battalion service to Catherine Houston 15 February 1849 in Salt Lake City, and had twelve children, to Martha Burwell also 15 February 1849 in Salt Lake City, and had at least twelve children, and Julia Owens in 1854 in Salt Lake City and had five children. Horace died in Provo 18 September 1881 and is buried in Springville, Utah.

In Far West in 1837/1838 Horace kept a store “according to a day book he kept. Some of the charge accounts of this little book are interesting: Saleratus 2 lbs. 30 cents, Candles 25 cents, Calico 50 cents, flour 24 lbs. $1.25, Molasses 50 cents. These items were paid for by pork….The Prophet… on his big white horse, would ride right into the store, and the horse would paw for what it wanted."

Horace and Nancy Alexander Endowments 24 January 1846 in the Nauvoo Temple, Illinois.

BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCH OF THE LIFE OF HORACE MARTIN ALEXANDER
(Containing also a short sketch of Nancy, his wife. Written and compiled in 1927 by his granddaughter, Lucille Walker.)

Horace Martin AlexanderMy Grandfather, Horace Martin Alexander was born near Cavesville, on a tobacco plantation, in Orange County, Virginia, February 15, 1812. His parents, James and Frances Ehart Alexander, had eight children, of whom Horace was the youngest. His brothers and sisters were: Willis, Adam, Willis 2nd, Fannie, Maria, James and Thorton. When Horace was still quite young, the family moved to another Plantation over in Kentucky, about two and one-half miles from Hillsboro, in Fleming county. In this home of luxury and ease the lad grew to young manhood. He had not been taught to work. A southern gentleman does not do that, only slaves and “white trash” need to work. It to interesting to note here that he was not fitted, either by nature or by training, for the life of a pioneer.

When he was about nineteen years old, he left his home and went out to seek his fortune elsewhere, to the chagrin of his parents. It is thought that an unfortunate love affair was the cause of his leaving.

We next hear of him in Ohio, going with some other boys to torment the Mormons, who were holding a meeting there. Grandfather listened to the words of the Elders. After that he attended more of their services. Here he became acquainted with a devout Mormon girl, Nancy Reader Walker. Through her influence he was converted. On September 14th, 1834 he and Nancy were married. They were with the saints in their migration from Ohio to Missouri.

On September 1st, 1836 when their first child, Frances Evelyn was born, they were living on a farm near Liberty in Clay County, Missouri. When, after a series of persecutions in Clay and Jackson County, the saints realized that they could expect no protection from the State, they petitioned the legislature to assign them a place where they might live. It was on this territory assigned them that the city of Far West was built. Here in 1837 and 1838 grandfather kept a store according to a day book he kept at this time. Some of the charge accounts of this little book are interesting: Saleratus 2 lbs. 30¢, Candles 25¢, Calico 50¢, flour 24 lbs. $1.25, Molasses 50¢. These items were paid for by pork.

Grandfather used to tell how friendly he and Joseph Smith were at this time. The Prophet, an imposing figure on his big white horse, would ride right into Grandfather's store, and the horse would paw for what it wanted.

The Saints soon became so numerous and so prosperous that the people of Missouri and even Governor Boggs feared that they would soon own Missouri (the Mormons were so united and thrifty, there was cause for alarm). The state militia supposedly called to quell the mobs, actually joined the mobs in driving the Mormons from Missouri, The Saints had to pledge their property to defray the cost of the war. They had to leave the state before spring, 1839.

The expulsion began in February and by the middle of April no Mormons were left In Missouri. Whither should they go? Homeless, almost destitute, they camped in tents and wagons on the banks of the frozen Missouri River. Some had been forced to flee without sufficient clothing and bedding to keep them warm. Grandfather, who had achieved property in Far West, had to leave everything behind, even his big trunk. His wife was in a delicate condition. He must find a home for her and their two and one-half year old daughter. How he ever succeeded in traveling way down the river to Alton in lower Illinois (Madison County) is not known. But here at Alton, in March, 1839, his day book records, a baby girl, Nancy, was born to them. What an experience for these two young parents. The family lived here about two years. On March 5, 1841, another daughter was born (our Grandmother) Sarah Malinda.

Most of the Saints on leaving Far West had gone up the Mississippi River to Quincy, Illinois, where they were treated with sympathy. They purchased a city of about twenty houses, called Commerce. Here they built the City of Nauvoo in a little over a year, a city of 15,000 people, 800 houses of stone, frame and logs. What an achievement for a years work! What other people could have done such a thing? Here in 1841 they began to build their temple. Joseph Smith, in a revelation, called all the Saints to bring their gold, etc, and come to Zion to help build the Temple. In answer to this call grandfather left Alton and joined the Saints at Nauvoo. In April 1841, we find he and his wife and their three children living at the home of a brother Ables. In Alton or earlier he seems to have learned carpentry for his day book records that he worked on the Temple beginning in March, 1842.

Once more he prospered. The little family was very happy. On October 15, 1843, their fourth child Dionitia was born. Soon after this, began the persecution which ended in the killing of the Prophet and in the expulsion of the Mormons from Illinois in the spring of 1846. Banoroft’s history gives the idea that Pres. Smith’s aspiring to be President of the United States and his beginning the Practice of Polygamy were probably the chief reasons for the expulsion,

The Mormons were driven almost at the point of the bayonet. They were not given sufficient time to dispose of their home and lands, but had to trade them off for whatever they could get. Early in February they set forth, destination unknown, to find a place where they might be safe. Their first camp was on Sugar Creek in Iowa. Here there was much suffering. The autumn found practically all of the Saints camped at Winter Quarters and Council Bluffs.

In the meantime war had been declared between the United States and Mexico. Brigham Young appealed to the government for work for his men, offering to help fight the U.S. battles. Accordingly, the Government called for 500 volunteers to be raised among the Saints. The Mormon men hated to leave their families to go off to war, but it meant that their monthly pay would help to buy the necessary outfits for conveying the Saints across the plains. Grandfather, along with nearly all the able bodied, husky men of the camps, enlisted in Company B. His wife and children were left in the care of the church.

The Mormon Battalion began the greatest march of infantry ever known, July 19, 1846, from Council Bluffs. The Mormon soldiers didn’t buy an outfit of shoes and clothing with the $40.00 allotted them by the government for that purpose. Instead they sent it back to their suffering families. As a consequence many of them were almost naked before the 2,000 mile march was half over. Their path lay over an uncharted desert. In some places food was so scarce they had to kill worn out horses and mules to eat. At one time they marched a hundred miles without water. On the San Pedro River there was an encounter with a herd of buffalo. Grandfather barely escaped with his life. They reached San Diego January 29th 1847, and found the Stars and Stripes floating there.

Back at Winter Quarters on January 1st, 1847, Nancy in the crudest of log huts, gave birth to a son Horace Martin Alexander, Jr. The weather was bitter cold. There was not sufficient bedding to keep the mother and babe warm and dry. The little lady was lonely. She called for her husband’s riding boots, which was all she had of him, and would hug them to her and weep. On the 28th of January she died. Three days later the month old infant died too.

With Nancy during her illness was my grandmother, Catherine Houston, then an orphan girl of fifteen years. After the children went to live with Nancy's sister, Mrs. Henry Rollins. Catherine was taken along too to take care of the children who loved her. Together they crossed the plains.

Grandfather, now a Corporal in the Battalion, received word of his wife’s death months later at San Diego. He could not go to his children until his term of enlistment expired in July, the 16th.

When he was mustered out of service he did not wait for his company to march, but with a companion or two, set forth at once on horseback for the Great Salt Lake. They arrived in Salt Lake about October 16th, 1847. Grandfather, who had bartered the shirt off his back to get a pint of beans to keep himself and his companions from starving, had to half bury himself in the straw of Brother Hamilton's stable, while his companion went to the house of Hamilton’s to explain his plight. That night Sister Hamilton made grandfather a shirt out of an old skirt.

Grandfather here received word that his children, with one of the Parley Pratt Companies was well on its way to the Valley. So with a few other brothers he hurried forth again on horseback to meet them. It is thought that he sighted the emigrant train somewhere in Wyoming.

It was touching, this meeting of the father and his motherless girls. It is small wonder that Grandfather learned to love this young Catherine when he first met her thus, mothering his children. The party reached Utah early in November. On November 6th Grandfather began to work for Madison Hamilton. Grandmother still continued to live with the Henry Rollins family and to take care of the little Alexanders.

On February 15, 1849, Horace and Catherine were married. At the same time, in obedience to the advise of his friend and leader Brigham Young, he married Martha Burwell, whom he had met in Salt Lake.

In 1853 Grandfather was called to help settle Parowan, Iron County. Carpenters were sorely needed. It was hard to have to leave their good comfortable home to go again into a new country. But they did without a murmur. They lived here eight years. Here my mother, Helen Alexander, was born. They came back to settle in Springville in November 1861.

Here Grandfather was made Captain of the “Silver Greys” a company of Militia organized to guard the town during the Civil War. For a few years both wives lived together in one house. Then Grandfather secured a home for each as the families were getting so large. In 1869 when Grandfather moved with Catherine and family to Provo to help build the woolen mills, Martha remained in Springville till her death, many years later.In November 1875, Grandfather sold his land to get money to go on a mission to the Southern States. He wished to convert his own people and also wished to see if he might get a share of his father's estate. He found his parents dead, says his diary, and his brothers and sisters either dead or most of them moved to Indiana, Chicago and other places. The estate, like many others, had been ravaged by the Civil War and had been sold. He found such misery and poverty there, in Virginia and Kentucky among those who had once been wealthy. He was very kindly received by his relatives, both of Kentucky and Virginia. In his birthplace, he found 1203 first cousins.

A nephew in Kentucky took him, in his fine barouche with his spanking bays, for a ride through Fleming County, Kentucky. The carriage was closed, and the horses trotted so fast they had gone a mile beyond his old home before he recognized the estate. Then he said he would not have known it but for the creek where he used to go fishing as a boy.

He returned from his mission in 1876. In September 1881 he died at his home in Provo. He was a man who loved honor and truth. He was fair, just and had a sense of humor. All who knew him loved and respected him.Of his thirty-five children, eleven are still living now in 1927. Several died at birth or a little later. The living are: Mrs. Max Kless of Springville, Mrs. Flora Bryan, Mrs. Celestine Humphrey, Mrs. Mildred Peterson, Mrs. Charlotta Gambell (Martha’s children). Mrs. Helen Harvey, W. D. Alexander and F. D. Alexander (Catherine’s children). Amasa Alexander and Albert Alexander (children of Julia Owens, divorced wife).Those of Grandmother’s family who have passed away are: Mrs. Lucy Collett, Mrs. Leona Clar, Mrs. Maud West, Mrs. Susie Roberts, Miss Blanch Alexander, and Mrs. Fedonia Richards.

Eveline WalkerDaughter Eveline Walker born 16 May 1823 in Randolph County Indiana, and married James Henry Rollins 4 September 1838 at her parents’ place on Shoal Creek, Caldwell County, Missouri same day as her sister Dionitia’s marriage to Jeremiah Plumb by Brigham Young. She and her husband’s Endowments 30 December 1846 Nauvoo Temple, Illinois. She died 25 September 1912 in Lyman, Wyoming and is buried by her husband. The rest of her information can be found at their website. http://jameshenryrollinspioneer.blogspot.com/.

--Compiled by descendant Andrea Lee Conley, June 2009



Far West Records of Oliver Walker in Winchester, Randolph County, Indiana

Far West Record, p. 33 par. 6
(Present)

Oliver Cowdery~33-2 Seymour Brunson
John Whitmer
Oliver Walker
Thomas B Marsh
George Burkett
(license taken in
1832 & 1833.)

Far West Record, p. 33 par. 7
Conference opened in prayer by br. Oliver Cowdery. And also the business & duties of conference explained &c. Br. Seymour Brunson then arose & stated the reason why he called this conference is to have some difficulty settled existing between the Elders residing in this place, &c.

Far West Record, p. 33 par. 8
Br. Henry Jackson arose and stated that the origin of the difficulty had arisen between him and the Church in consequence of himself and br. Isaac~33-3 reading certain passages in the Acts, & also in the book of Mormon for they thought that they [page 34] found therein recorded that the disciples had ought or was privileged to live in common stock.~34-4

Far West Record, p. 34 par. 2
Adjourned until to morrow 9 O'clock A.M. Prayer by br. T. B. Marsh.

Far West Record, p. 34 par. 3
John Whitmer.

Far West Record, p. 34 par. 4
~33-1 Winchester, Randolph County, Indiana, situated near the Indiana-Ohio border, is located approximately 75 miles east of Indianapolis, and about 225 miles southwest of Kirtland, Ohio. The branch of the Church in Winchester, initially built up by Levi Hancock and Zebedee Coltrin during the months of June-September 1831, has been overlooked by nearly all historians. Several of the converts to Mormonism in Winchester gathered with the Saints in Missouri. (See Levi Hancock Journal, Special Collections, Harold B. Lee Library, Brigham Young University.)

Far West Record, p. 34 par. 5
~33-2 Oliver Cowdery and John Whitmer left Ohio for Missouri on November 20, 183 I, and arrived in Jackson County, Missouri, January 5, 1832. (See Book of John Whitmer, chapter 10.) They were to carry the revelations to Missouri for printing as per the Hiram, Ohio, Conference in November 1831. While en route to Missouri, the two brethren stopped in Winchester, Indiana, to regulate the affairs of the Church there. See Levi Hancock Journal, Special Collections, Harold B. Lee Library, Brigham Young University.

Far West Record, p. 34 par. 6
~33-3 Isaac Follis.

Far West Record, p. 34 par. 7
~34-4 Here is evidence of confusion on the matter of common ownership of property among new converts in eastern Indiana. Early members of the Church in Kirtland, Ohio (including Levi W. Hancock, whose letter seems to have been the source of the problems being addressed in the text) had practiced a system of consecration known as "common stock" (communal ownership of real and personal property). After the arrival of the Prophet to the area in February I 831, official guidelines clarified that each member should be allocated his own portion. However, the 1831-33 phase of the Church's law of consecration did not secure private ownership of property. Early contracts used by Bishop Partridge in Jackson County, Missouri, stipulated that real estate was "leased" to the individual member, that personal property was "loaned," and that in cases of transgression or unworthiness, members forfeited any or all of their stewardship properties. These early arrangements were defective for obvious reasons, and, when challenged by some dissenters, were not upheld by the courts. These procedures were subsequently modified so as to "give a deed, securing to him who receives . . . his inheritance . . . to be his individual property, his private stewardship." (See letter from Joseph Smith to Edward Partridge, 2 May 1833, Joseph Smith Collection, Church Archives. For references to the challenging of the legality of these proceedings, see History of the Church 1:380, cited from Evening and Morning Star 2 July 1833]:110 and the Painesville Telegraph [Painesville, Ohio], April 26, 1833.)



Far West Record, p. 35 par. 1
November 30, 1831

Far West Record, p. 35 par. 2
Conference convened according to appointment.~35-1a Opened in prayer by Thomas B. Marsh. Observations made by all the Elders present & they unanimously agreed that all this difficulty has arisen in consequence of misrepresentations of a writing which was represented to have been written by br. Henry Jackson & a letter written by br. Levi Hancock & Zebedee Coltrin to br Henry Jackson in consequence of misrepresentations thereof all these difficulties have arisen.

Far West Record, p. 35 par. 3
Br. Oliver Cowdery then arose & made a proposition that br. Henry Jackson be restored to his former standing providing he make a statement to the branch that he had done & said things that were wrong for which he was sorry in all humility.~35-2

Far West Record, p. 35 par. 4
Resolved that this Conference be adjourned until the Church is notified and assembled & this subject laid before them.

Far West Record, p. 35 par. 5
Conference adjourned until to-morrow P.M. early candle lighting~35-3

Far West Record, p. 35 par. 6
Prayer by br. Oliver Cowdery

Far West Record, p. 35 par. 7
John Whitmer Clerk.

Far West Record, p. 35 par. 8
~35-1a November 30, 1831.

Far West Record, p. 35 par. 9
~35-2 Note that Henry Jackson publicly acknowledged his error and was officially forgiven by the Church.

Far West Record, p. 35 par. 10
35-3 An expression used to indicate the evening hours.

Far West Record, p. 35 par. 11
December 1, 1831

Far West Record, p. 35 par. 12
Conference convened according to adjournment.~35-1b Opened. prayer by Seymour Brunson. Minutes read by John Whitmer. Observations by Oliver Cowdery by way of exhortation to the Church.

Far West Record, p. 35 par. 13
All the brethren forgave br. Henry Jackson and he the brethren and thus this difficulty is settled.



Far West Record, p. 36 par. 1
Br. Seymour Brunson was ordained to the High Priesthood and br. Henry Jackson again ordained an Elder under the hand of Oliver Cowdery. Conference closed in prayer by br. Oliver Cowdery.

Far West Record, p. 36 par. 2
John Whitmer Clerk.

Far West Record, p. 36 par. 3
~35-1b December 1, 1831.

Far West Record, p. 36 par. 4
December 6, 1831

Far West Record, p. 36 par. 5
Minutes of a Conference held in Randolph County Indiana December 6. 1831.

Far West Record, p. 36 par. 6
Present.

Oliver Cowdery Isaac Follis
John Whitmer George Heartly
Thomas B. Marsh George Burkett
Seymour Brunson Oliver Walker
Henry Jackson, (These two lost both
licenses or taken
at present.)~36-1

Far West Record, p. 36 par. 7
Br. Oliver Cowdery appointed Moderator & John Whitmer Clerk.

Far West Record, p. 36 par. 8
Prayer by br. Seymour Brunson.

Far West Record, p. 36 par. 9
Br Oliver Cowdery then arose and addressed the Elders, showing them the necessity of having their hearts drawn out in prayer to God & also realize that they are in the immediate presence of God & also explained the order of the High Priesthood &c The Church then proceeded to settle some difficulty that existed between them in the presence of the conference.

Far West Record, p. 36 par. 10
Firstly the case of Sister George Burkett & Sister Eunice. Statement of both parties, Sister Burkett manifested a spirit of [page 37] humility and contrition Sister Eunice a Spirit of hardness and self justification

Far West Record, p. 37 par. 2
Resolved that Brs. Seymour Brunson & Isaac Follis, go and visit Sister Eunice as soon as possible

Far West Record, p. 37 par. 3
Secondly the case of br George Burkett br Eunice br Burkett made the same acknowledgement that his wife did the aforementioned Elders also labored with br Eunice

Far West Record, p. 37 par. 4
Br Oliver then arose & chastised br Burkett in the name of the conference for his previous neglect of duty, &c.

Far West Record, p. 37 par. 5
Thirdly. The case of br James More was then called in question misconduct in his family. the letter which he had previously written to the Church was then read in the conference. Some further remarks were then made by br Lee stating that br More was guilty of bad conduct since the letter was Written James More acknowledged that he was guilty of whipping his wife.~37-2 After that he was questioned by br Thomas Marsh Whether he thought that he was worthy to retain his license in the Church as a Teacher he answered in the negative & desired that this conference would receive his license which was done accordingly.

Far West Record, p. 37 par. 6
Fourthly the case of brs George Heartly & Oliver Walker called in. Conference adjourned until tomorrow morning at 9 P.M.

Far West Record, p. 37 par. 7
Prayer by br Seymour Brunson

Far West Record, p. 37 par. 8
John Whitmer

Far West Record, p. 37 par. 9
~36-1 George Burkett and Oliver Walker.

Far West Record, p. 37 par. 10
~37-2 Here we see that the Church did not approve of wife-whipping; on the other hand, James More was not severely punished.

Far West Record, p. 37 par. 11
December 7, 1831

Far West Record, p. 37 par. 12
Conference Convened according to adjournment~37-1 opened by singing, "Go On Ye Pilgrims, &c" & Prayer by br. Thomas B. Marsh.



Far West Record, p. 38 par. 1
Brother Oliver Cowdery then read the 15 Psalm & 24 Ps.~38-2 & 33 chapter & 13 verse of Isaiah's Prophecy. Brs. George Heartly & Oliver Walker then withdrew to settle the difficulty between themselves but could not agree Therefore decided that two should be appointed by the Moderator. Brs. John Whitmer & ThoMas B. Marsh to go.~38-3 Conference suspended. After some conversation with the parties they agreed to abide the decision of John & Thomas who concluded that Oliver Walker pay George Heartly which was his just due. After which it was laid before the Conference but it was with much cavilling on the part of Walker to stand or hold fast to his agreement. Finally Walker did agree & truly humbled himself & they came together as brothers and disciples & all matters were settled & buried.~38-4

Far West Record, p. 38 par. 2
Conference closed by singing "My Loving Fellow Travelers," & prayer by br Oliver Cowdery

Far West Record, p. 38 par. 3
John Whitmer Clerk of Con. Dec. 7. 1831.

Far West Record, p. 38 par. 4
~37-1 December 7, 1831.

Far West Record, p. 38 par. 5
~38-2 Note the reading of scriptures in Church meetings.

Far West Record, p. 38 par. 6
~38-3 Going two by two was customary not only in missionary work, but in laboring with recalcitrant Saints.

Far West Record, p. 38 par. 7
~38-4 Although the problem was considered "buried" at this conference, it surfaced again and was a matter of business in Kirtland in December 1834. See Kirtland Council Minute Book, page 81.

Kirtland Council Minute Book, December 1834, page 81

Journal History 10 October 1840, History of the Church V4

Journal History, 10 Oct 1840, from HC

Saturday, October 10 [1840]. David Fulmer preferred a charge against Oliver Walker "For reporting certain slanderous stories of a fallacious and calumniating nature, calculated to stigmatize, and raise a persecution against the church and individuals in it, in this place [Nauvoo], and for a variety of unchristianlike conduct, &c.," before the High Council at Nauvoo. The defendant pleaded that "he was not prepared to meet the charge, it being too indefinite," &c. Council adjourned till next day.

Journal History, 11 October 1840, from HC
Sunday, October 11 [1840] The High Council in Nauvoo, Ill., met according to adjournment. The charge against Oliver Walker was taken up, and the following substituted:--'To the High Council of the Church of Jesus Christ at Nauvoo:--For and in behalf of said church, I prefer a charge against Elder Oliver Walker for several different offenses hereinafter set forth, as said to be by him done, performed, said, and committed, as well as various duties omitted, &c., all of which were done at different times, periods, places, and seasons subsequent to Sept. 1st, A. D. 1838, to-wit:--

Journal History, 11 October 1840, from HC
For a general course of procedure, of acts, doings and words, and suggestions by him, the said Elder Oliver Walker, done, performed, said, spoken, hinted at, and suggested; both directly and indirectly, and as calculated to be derogatory to the character of the heads, and leaders of the church, and extremely injurious and hurtful to the upbuilding, welfare, being, and advancement of the same, namely, for fleeing from, quitting and deserting the society, ranks and needs of his brethren, in times of difficulty with, and danger from their enemies, "the mob;" restraining from the use of his brethren, his influence, efforts, and needful assistance, at such times of need; as also for joining with, and strengthening the hands, will, evil pursuits, and designs of the mob, and gentile enemies of the church, by expressions, hints, and suggestions of wavering and dubious nature, respecting the faith and order of the church, and of the professed calling, qualifications, proceedings, &c., of Joseph Smith, junior, as a seer, prophet, and one called to bring to light the fulness of the gospel, &c., in these last days.

Journal History, 11 October 1840, from HC
Likewise for advancing ideas, notions or opinions, that the different orders or sects, namely, Methodists and others, could by a pursuit in their faith, order, and pursuits, as readily obtain every celestial attainment, and gospel advantage, as they could by embracing and pursuing the system brought forth by Joseph Smith, junior, in these last days.

Journal History, 11 October 1840, from HC
And moreover for suggesting within the last six months, at Alton, Nauvoo, intermediate and adjacent places, that in the Church at Nauvoo there did exist a set of pilferers, who were actually thieving, robbing plundering, taking and unlawfully carrying away from Missouri, certain goods and chattels, wares and property; and that the act and acts of such supposed thieving, &c., was fostered and conducted by the knowledge and approbation of the heads and leaders of the Church, viz., by the Presidency and High Council; all of which items set forth as aforesaid, together with any and all corroborating acts, doings, hints, expressions, and suggestions in any way belong to, or connected with, any or all of the aforesaid accusations, he, the said Oliver Walker, is hereby notified to prepare to defend in said trial.
Dated Oct. 11, 1840, Nauvoo.
DAVID FULMER.
Walker pleaded that he was not prepared to defend himself, and the trial was deferred at his request till April Conference.


History of the Church, Vol.4, Ch.12, p.219
David Fulmer preferred a charge against Oliver Walker "for reporting certain slanderous stories of a fallacious and calumniating nature, calculated to stigmatize, and raise a persecution against the Church and individuals in it, in this place, [Nauvoo], and for other acts of unchristianlike conduct," before the High Council at Nauvoo. The defendant pleaded that "he was not prepared to meet the charge, it being too indefinite." Council adjourned till next day.
History of the Church, Vol.4, Ch.12, p.219
Sunday, 11.--High Council met according to adjournment. The charge against Oliver Walker was taken up, and the following substituted for the first charge:
History of the Church, Vol.4, Ch.12, p.219
Minutes of the High Council.
History of the Church, Vol.4, Ch.12, p.219
To the High Council of the Church of Jesus Christ at Nauvoo:
History of the Church, Vol.4, Ch.12, p.219
For and in behalf of said Church, I prefer a charge against Elder Oliver Walker, for several different offenses hereinafter set forth, as said to be by him done, performed, said, and committed, as well as various duties omitted, all of which was done at different times, periods, places, and seasons, subsequent to September 1st, A.D. 1838, to-wit.:
History of the Church, Vol.4, Ch.12, p.219
For a general course of procedure, of acts, doings, and words, and suggestions by him, the said Elder Oliver Walker, done, performed, said, spoken, hinted at, and suggested, both directly and indirectly, and as calculated to be derogatory to the character of the heads and leaders of the Church, and extremely injurious and hurtful to the upbuilding, welfare, being, and advancement of the same, namely, for fleeing from, quitting, and deserting the society, ranks, and needs of his brethren, in times of difficulty with, and danger from their enemies, "the mob;" restraining from the use of his brethren, his influence, efforts, and needful assistance, at such times of need; as also for joining with, and strengthening the hands, will, evil pursuits, and designs of the mob, and Gentile enemies of the Church, by expressions, hints, and suggestions of wavering and dubious nature, respecting the faith and order of the Church, and of the professed calling, qualifications, proceedings, &c., of Joseph Smith, Jun., as a Seer, Prophet, and one called to bring to light the fullness of the Gospel, &c., in these last days.
History of the Church, Vol.4, Ch.12, p.220
Likewise for advancing ideas, notions, or opinions, that the different orders or sects, namely, Methodists and others, could by a pursuit in their faith, order, and pursuits, as readily obtain every celestial attainment and Gospel advantage, as they could by embracing and pursuing the system brought forth by Joseph Smith, Jun., in these last days.
History of the Church, Vol.4, Ch.12, p.220
And moreover for suggesting within the last six months, at Alton, Nauvoo, intermediate and adjacent places, that in the Church at Nauvoo there did exist a set of pilferers, who were actually thieving, robbing plundering, taking and unlawfully carrying away from Missouri, certain and chattels, wares and property; and that the act and acts of such supposed thieving, &c., was fostered and conducted by the knowledge and approbation of the heads and leaders of the Church, viz., by the Presidency and High Council; all of which items set forth as aforesaid, together with any and all corroborating acts, doings, hints, expressions, and suggestions in any way belonging to, or connected with, any or all of the aforesaid accusations, he, the said Oliver Walker, is hereby notified to prepare to defend in said trial. Dated October 11, 1840, Nauvoo. DAVID FULMER.
History of the Church, Vol.4, Ch.12, p.220
Walker pleaded that he was not prepared to defend himself, and the trial was deferred at his request till April conference.

(We do no yet know how this turned out as of August 1009.)



5 comments:

  1. I'm a descendent of John James Walker (b: 4 Dec 1819) who was a Mormon "Preacher" and lived in Nauvoo for a time. His sister Mary married Joshua Olmsted and also resided in Nauvoo. Can anyone point me in the right direction to find out more about my Mormon Walkers?

    walkermd@mac.com

    ReplyDelete
  2. It is a very informative post you got there,about Scottish Trust Deeds. I am sure it will help a lot of people who are seeking help on deeds. Looking forward to see more like these from you.

    ReplyDelete
  3. 1840 October 10, charges against Oliver Walker by David Fullmer, put off until April.
    I have been researching this case for many years and I wonder what happened to the trial records and the final judgement?

    I also have been told that Oliver Walker's wife Nancy Cressie Walker was married to Brigham Young is that true? That is what the LDS genealogy site says.

    ReplyDelete
  4. Do you want to add this information about Horace Martin Alexander Company's expedition to Salt Lake from California?

    Mormon Pioneer Overland Travel, 1847–1868

    1847 Horace M. Alexander Company

    Departure: 24 July 1847
    Arrival: 16 October 1847

    Company Information:
    This small company of returning Mormon Battalion veterans traveled from Los Angeles north to cross over the Sierra Mountains and then to Salt Lake. It was composed of only five men and one boy.
    View a list of individuals known to have traveled in this company.
    View a list of sources to learn more about this company.

    Photo Not Available
    Mormon Pioneer Overland Travel, 1847–1868

    (The number shown in parentheses next to each name is the age of the pioneer at the time of the journey.)

    Horace M. Alexander Company (1847)

    Alexander, Horace Martin (35)

    Bulkley, Newman (30)

    Colton, Charles Edwin (12)

    Colton, Philander (35)

    Curtis, Dorr Purdy (28)

    Day, Abraham (29)

    Mormon Pioneer Overland Travel, 1847–1868

    Alexander, Horace Martin

    Birth Date: 15 Feb. 1812
    Death Date: 18 Sep. 1881
    Gender: Male
    Age: 35
    Company: Horace M. Alexander Company (1847)

    Sources:
    Bulkley, Newman, "Fifteen Months' Experience," Juvenile Instructor 17, no. 21 (1 Nov. 1882): 334. Read Trail Excerpt
    Source Locations

    Ricketts, Norma Baldwin, The Mormon Battalion: U.S. Army of the West, 1846-1848, [1996], 169. Source Locations

    Ricketts, Norma Baldwin, The Mormon Battalion: U.S. Army of the West, 1846-1848, [1996], 23. Source Locations

    ReplyDelete
  5. You have a great Blog and it has given me inspiration to do my family research post here. I have a myfamily.com account but there is no space or format to blog like this. I'm going to do the Steele branch and Ivie famly if your interested we can link up this site with mine?

    ReplyDelete